Wetlands around the World

Let’s take a brief glance at wetlands around the world. Wetlands exist in many climates and on every continent except Antarctica. Considered the most biologically diverse of all ecosystems, wetlands provide habitat for an array of water, land, and migratory bird species. The wetlands highlighted include swamps, bogs, marshes, estuaries, floodplains, lakes and many other types.

The Pantanal

The Pantanal is located in the heart of South America and is the world’s largest wetland that has not been significantly modified by humans. The Pantanal is often referred to as South America’s biggest biodiversity star stretching across Brazil, Bolivia, and Paraguay. Its complex system of marshlands, floodplains, lagoons and interconnected drainage lines is home to over 4,700 species of plants and animals. The array of life in the Pantanal relies on an annual flooding cycle. The cycle of waters rising and then receding through the dry season nurtures a biologically diverse group of plants and is essential to preserve a healthy ecosystem.

Camargue

The Camargue, also referred to as the Rhone River Delta, is an alluvial plain located in the Southeast of France. Roughly a third of the Camargue wetlands are either lakes or marsh. This wetland is one of the most highly rated places in Europe for birdwatching. The area is historically famous for the greater flamingo and Camargue’s horses. If you are enticed to visit the Camargue, be sure to look into horseback riding on this special breed of horses.

Kafue Flats

Located in central Zambia, the Kafue flats consist of a unique variety of wetland types. The landscape located along the Kafue River includes grasslands, lagoons, swamps and marshes. This wetland is extremely important to Zambia for hosting wildlife, fishing, sugarcane farming and the production of hydro-electric power. Within the Kafue National Park you can spot a number of safari camps and lodges that have brought new interest to the area and attract many tourists.

kafue flats

Sundarbans

The meaning of “Sundarbans” is beautiful forests, which perfectly fits the name for the largest mangrove forest in the world. The region is also home to Sundari trees growing in salty coastal waters. These are a special kind of mangrove tree with roots called pneumatophores that emerge above the ground and aid in gaseous exchange. Along with serving as home to Sundari trees, this wetland region has possibly the largest population of Bengal tigers in the world. These tigers can be found swimming in the saline waters of this unique habitat in the same areas used by people.

sundarbans

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The Pantanal — The Largest Wetland in the World

Located in the heart of South America is the world’s largest wetland that has not been significantly modified by humans, the Pantanal. The Pantanal is often referred to as South America’s biggest biodiversity star. However, it is also one of the continent’s best-kept secrets, often overshadowed by the Amazon Rainforest. This massive wetland covers an area estimated at 75,000 square miles across Bolivia, Paraguay, and (mostly) Brazil. The Pantanal is home to over 4,700 species of plants and animals.

The array of life in the Pantanal relies on an annual flooding cycle. When it rains, about 80 percent of the floodplain is submerged underwater; throughout the dry season the water lessens. This process is essential to nurturing a biologically diverse collection of plants and providing nutrients that the wetlands need to flourish. An area that is the size of Belgium, Switzerland, Holland, and Portugal combined needs a lot of water to guarantee that it continues to flood and a healthy ecosystem is preserved. The quality of the water is also important to maintaining a nourishing environment. Recently, human activity has been threatening this precious wetland. The Pantanal is threatened by intensive farming, deforestation, and pollution. Few signs of this situation improving are shown, and environmental issues are difficult to resolve quickly. Conservation of the biodiversity and natural resources of the Pantanal is essential.