Coastwide Vegetative Planting (LA-39)

 

The coastal restoration community has long recognized the benefits of vegetative plantings in restoration. Many marsh creation and most terracing projects require plantings to insure success. Coastal shoreline plantings have also proven to be very effective and some have demonstrated the ability to not only stop shoreline erosion but to facilitate accretion, the process of increasing sediments. Recent hurricane events have exposed a need to have a mechanism in place where large-scale planting efforts can be deployed in a timely manner to specifically targeted areas of need, anywhere along the coast. Although the CWPPRA program can fund specific largescale planting projects, the normal program cycle for individual projects can delay needed restoration plantings for a number of years.

The goals of this project are to facilitate a consistent and responsive planting effort in coastal Louisiana that is flexible enough to routinely plant on a large scale and be able to rapidly respond to critical areas of need following storm or other damaging events. This project set up an advisory panel consisting of representatives from various state and federal agencies who would assist in the selection of projects for funding. The project also set up a mechanism by which project nominations would be submitted for consideration. The equivalent of 90 acres of interior marsh and 40,000 linear feet of coastal shoreline will be planted per year over a 10 year period to effectively create/protect a total of 779 net acres of marsh over the 20-year project life.

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The project features are located in the coastal zone of Louisiana.

This project is on Priority Project List 20. Three sites have been planted with Year One funding, and three sites are scheduled to be planted in 2014 with Year Two funding.

 

Federal Sponsor: NRCS

Local Sponsor: CPRA

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Pass Chaland to Grand Bayou Pass Barrier Shoreline Restoration (BA-35)

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Reasons for Restoration:

Prior to construction, wetlands, dune, and swale habitats within the project area had undergone substantial loss due to subsidence, absolute sea-level rise, and marine- and wind induced shoreline erosion. In addition, oil and gas activities, such as pipeline construction, also contributed to the loss.

Marine processes acting on the abandoned deltaic headlands rework and redistribute previously deposited sediment. Fragmentary islands develop due to breaches in the barrier headland. Subsequently, increased tidal prism storage (the total volume of salt water that moves in and out of a bay with the tide) and storm-related impacts have led to inlet and pass formation across the newly formed islands. The Bay Joe Wise beach rim was receded and decreased to a critical width that was susceptible to breaching.

Land area in the project area had decreased from 1932 to 2000. Storms occur approximately every 8.3 years along the Barataria shoreline. Because approximately 100 feet of shoreline is eroded with each storm, shorelines of 100 feet or less are considered in imminent danger of breaching.

Restoration Strategies:

The project’s objectives were: 1) preventing the breaching of the Bay Joe Wise shoreline by increasing barrier shoreline width; 2) increasing back-barrier, emergent marsh area by some 226 acres to maintain the barrier shoreline; and 3) creating emergent marsh suitable for tidal aquatic habitats.

The Project features included a constructed beach and dune platform along approximately 2.7 miles of the gulf shoreline. Constructed landward of the beach and dune was a marsh platform with an average width of 860 feet spanning the entire project length. A water exchange channel was incorporated on the western end of the Project to facilitate flushing of Bay Joe Wise through Pass Chaland. The Project created over 420 acres requiring 2.95 million cubic yards of fill dredged from ebb shoal borrow areas. Other project features included installation of sand fencing concurrent with dune construction, dune and marsh vegetative plantings, and post-construction gapping of retention dikes.

FP_BA-35_Banner map.png Above image from lacoast.gov

Location:

The project is located in the Barataria Basin, between Pass Chaland and Grand Bayou Pass in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana.

This project is on Priority Project List (PPL) 11.

 

Source: 

Louisiana Coastal Wetlands Conservation and Restoration Task Force “Pass Chaland to Grand Bayou Pass Barrier Shoreline Restoration (BA-35)”. 2 March 2018, https://www.lacoast.gov/reports/gpfs/BA-35.pdf.

Fritchie Marsh Creation and Terracing

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A significant portion of the Fritchie Marsh was lost due to
Hurricane Katrina. Post storm shallow open water areas
dominate the landscape which limits the effectiveness of the
PO-06 CWPRRA project. Wetlands in the project vicinity
are being lost at the rate -1.09%/year based on USGS
data from 1985 to 2015. These marshes cannot recover
without replacement of lost sediment, which is critical if the
northshore marshes are to be sustained.

Project goals include restoring and nourishing marsh.
Specific goals of the project are: 1) create approximately 291
acres of marsh; 2) nourish approximately 49 acres of existing
marsh; and 3) construct about 36,610 feet of earthen terraces
or 26 emergent acres.

An alternative analysis was conducted leading to the
selection of features and configuration to compliment and
work synergistically with the existing PO-06 project and
planned mitigation and restoration projects in the Fritchie
Marsh. A robust engineering cost is included to evaluate
increasing the project size if costs allow or adjust the
layout, if needed during Phase 1. Approximately 2 million
cubic yards of material would be placed confined to restore
291 acres and nourish approximately 49 acres of brackish
marsh. Material would be dredged from a borrow site in
Lake Pontchartrain. The borrow site would be designed to
avoid and minimize impacts to aquatic habitat and existing
shorelines. Approximately 26 acres of earthen terraces would
be constructed within various locations totaling approximately
36,610 feet or 523 acres of terrace field. All containment
dikes would be gapped or degraded no later than three years
after construction to facilitate the development of tidal marsh
functions supportive of estuarine species. The terraces would
be planted as well as 50% of the created marsh acres to
expedite colonization and enhance stabilization.

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Region 1, Pontchartrain Basin, St. Tammany Parish, located
approximately three miles southeast of Slidell, Louisiana. A
substantial portion of the project is located on Big Branch
National Wildlife Refuge.

This project was approved for Phase I Engineering and
Design in January 2016.

This project is on Priority Project List (PPL) 25.

The Fritchie Marsh Creation and Terracing sponsors include:

 

The People of Louisiana’s Coastal Wetlands

The Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act leads the fight against Louisiana’s disappearing coast. The native people of coastal Louisiana are greatly worried about losing their homes, sources of livelihood, and culture if the lands they live on continue to disappear. Saltwater intrusion, marshes becoming open water, and the disappearance of barrier islands and protective wetlands are a few of the challenges facing coastal communities. For centuries, marshes have served as home to numerous people: American Indian tribes, Vietnamese, Croatian Americans, and other groups. All of these coastal residents are familiar with the hardship of living in an area frequented by natural disasters. Most coastal residents have chosen to stay on their lands to defend and protect the ecosystem despite the extreme risks. Without the hard work and effort of diligent landowners and organizations like CWPPRA, coastal Louisiana would be vanishing at a much faster rate.

You can read Watermarks #48 People of the Coastal Wetlands to learn more about this topic.

Sabine Refuge Marsh Creation Cycle I

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The project is intended to strategically create marsh in large,
open water areas to block wind-induced saltwater
introduction and freshwater loss. In addition, it will increase
nourishment in adjacent marshes while reducing open water
fetch (distance a wave can travel) and the erosion of marsh
fringe.

Cycle I constructed 214 acres of marsh within the shallow,
open water area within retention dikes. The perimeter of the
created marsh was planted with smooth cordgrass. Dredged
slurry obtained from the Army Corps of Engineers’ dredging
of the Calcasieu River Ship Channel was placed in the
containment area.

Upon consolidation of the dredged material, the southern
containment dike was degraded and breached to allow for
water movement and restore the area to more natural
conditions. Prior to the placement of dredged material,
trenasses (small, man-made bayous) were constructed in the
project area. These trenasses facilitate natural conditions and
allow estuarine organisms to access the created marsh. This
project is part of five cycles over a 10-year period with each
cycle requiring individual construction approval.

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The Sabine Refuge Marsh Creation Project is located in the
Sabine National Wildlife Refuge, west of LA Highway 27, in
large, open water areas north and northwest of Brown’s Lake
in Cameron Parish, Louisiana.

Priority Project List 8 funded $5.9 million to complete
construction of a permanent pipeline and one cycle of marsh
creation. Engineering analyses at the time indicated that the
construction of a temporary pipeline would be more cost
effective. Therefore, a temporary pipeline was utilized for
Cycle I. However, further analysis determined that a
permanent pipeline would be advantageous. In 2004,
additional funds for engineering and design and construction
were approved for Cycles II and III. Funds for Cycle II
include the construction of a permanent dredged material
pipeline.

Construction of the Cycle I site was completed on February
26, 2002.

This project is on Priority Project List (PPL) 8.

The Sabine Refuge Marsh Creation Cycle I’s three sponsors include:

View more data on the CS-28-1 project or other projects on CWPPRA’s website.

National Estuaries Week

On August 3, 2017, the Senate unanimously approved a resolution designating the week of September 16th through September 23rd as National Estuaries Week.

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Over 100 million people nationwide live near estuaries and use these resources in their daily lives through agriculture, tourism, commercial fishing, power generation, and as shipping ports. Estuaries, where the river mouths meet the ocean, are where fresh and saltwater mix.  One of the most expansive and productive estuaries in the world is located in the United States at the interface of the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico. Along with providing jobs, estuaries have one of the highest productivity rates among ecosystems in the world. Estuaries serve as habitat for fish, waterfowl, and a variety of other wildlife by providing food and shelter during migration and mating season.

Estuaries are a well-known hotspot for recreational fishing. Take part in celebrating National Estuaries Week by reeling in a big catch while helping to keep your estuary areas clean of trash and healthy for the wildlife and vegetation. Visit our friends over at the Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program for a list of activities and ways you can participate in National Estuaries Week.

LaBranche East Marsh Creation

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Dredging of access and flotation canals for the construction
of I-10 and the Illinois Central Railroad resulted in increased
salinity and altered hydrology in the area that exacerbated
the conversion of wetland vegetation into shallow open
water bodies.

The project’s primary goal is to restore marsh that has been
converted to open water. Project implementation will result
in an increase of wildlife and fisheries habitat, acreage and
diversity, along with improving water quality. In addition,
the project will provide a storm buffer protection to I-10, the
region’s primary westward hurricane evacuation route, and
complement hurricane protection measures in the area.
Project features consist of the creation of 729 acres of marsh
and the nourishment of 202 acres of existing marsh using
dedicated dredging from Lake Pontchartrain. In addition,
10,000 linear feet of tidal creeks will be created. The marsh
creation area will have a target elevation the same as average
healthy marsh for this region. Plans are to place the dredge
material in the target area with the use of low level, noncontinuous
retention dikes along the edge of the project area
allowing overtopping of material to nourish the marsh fringe.
Vegetative plantings will be utilized in the areas deemed
most critical by the project team. Successful wetland
restoration in the immediate area (PO-17) clearly
demonstrates the suitability and stability of soil and material
availability from a sustainable borrow area.

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The project features are located between Lake Pontchartrain
and I-10 in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana. It is bounded on
the west by the Fall Canal and the Bayou LaBranche
Wetland Creation Project (PO-17) and the east by a pipeline
canal.

This project is on Project Priority List (PPL) 19.

The LaBranche East Marsh Creation project sponsors include:

Keep up with this project and other CWPPRA projects on the project page.